In the Footsteps of Doves

8 November 2013
Overview

In the Footsteps of Doves takes its title from Nietszche's poetic assertion that "It is the stillest words which bring the storm. Thoughts that come with doves' footsteps guide the world"

(Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra, chapter 44, "The Stillest Hour")

Nietszche proposes that the greatest radicalism is quiet, rather than demonstrative, gentle rather than aggressive. Similarly, this exhibition proposes that the most radical first steps towards modernism were not through the polemics and manifestos of the early twentieth century radicals, but through the quieter foot soldiers of the nineteenth century avant-garde.

By pairing works from the 19th and 20th century In The Footsteps of Doves seeks to build bridges between the centuries and to shed new light on the achievements of these remarkable artists.

The exhibition ranges from the streets of Paris to the darkrooms of the Institute of Design in Chicago, from the distant ruins of Algeria, Egypt and Syria to the prosaic immediacy of the artists surroundings.

Installation Views
Press release

In the Footsteps of Doves takes its title from Nietszche's poetic assertion that "It is the stillest words which bring the storm. Thoughts that come with doves' footsteps guide the world" (Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra, chapter 44, "The Stillest Hour")

Nietszche proposes that the greatest radicalism is quiet, rather than demonstrative, gentle rather than aggressive. Similarly, this exhibition proposes that the most radical first steps towards modernism were not through the polemics and manifestos of the early twentieth century radicals, but through the quieter foot soldiers of the nineteenth century avant-garde.

By pairing works from the 19th and 20th century In The Footsteps of Doves seeks to build bridges between the centuries and to shed new light on the achievements of these remarkable artists.

The exhibition ranges from the streets of Paris to the darkrooms of the Institute of Design in Chicago, from the distant ruins of Algeria, Egypt and Syria to the prosaic immediacy of the artists surroundings.